{ site_name:'The John W. Kluge Center', subscribe_url:'/share/sites/Bapu4ruC/kluge.php' }
[Henry Kissinger with Egyptian President Sadat]. 1975.

Henry Kissinger with Egyptian President Sadat. 1975.

About the Program

The Kissinger Program establishes a non-partisan focus in the nation’s capital for the discussion of key issues in foreign affairs. The Program aims to serve as a catalyst for the fresh analysis of foreign affairs in the global era by sustaining in perpetuity two appointments and related programs that ensure that the subject of foreign affairs, taken broadly, receives reflective and considered treatment each year in Washington, D.C. by distinguished, experienced scholars and practitioners.

Kissinger Scholar

The Kissinger Scholar is the first of the two distinguished appointments. The Kissinger Scholar holds the Kissinger Chair and is appointed annually by the Librarian of Congress upon the recommendation of a Selection Committee consisting of representatives from the academic community and high-ranking foreign policy experts no longer in office. The Scholar is a distinguished senior research position in residence at the Library’s John W. Kluge Center that engages in research on foreign policy and international affairs that will lead to publication.  

Kissinger Lecturer

The Kissinger Lecturer is the second of the appointments. The Lecturer is appointed by the Librarian of Congress to deliver the Kissinger Lecture, a high-profile address delivered on Capitol Hill to Congressional and Federal agency members and staff, diplomats, foreign policy experts, area universities and the foreign policy community at-large. The Lecturer will have achieved distinction in the field of foreign affairs and, like the Scholar, may be of any nationality.

The Setting

Uniquely situated for research, analysis and serious discussion of America’s relation to the world, the Library of Congress offers facilities for scholars, universal collections spanning more than 470 languages, broad language and subject expertise of the Library staff, the central and neutral position of the Library on Capitol Hill, and the inspiring atmosphere of the magnificent Thomas Jefferson Building in which to annually examine the general subject of the United States and its relationship with the world.

Funding

The Kissinger Program is made possible by generous donations of the friends and admirers of Dr. Henry A. Kissinger, the 56th Secretary of State of the United States and a past recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Librarian of Congress James H. Billington announced the establishment of the Henry A. Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress on June 26, 2000, during the Library’s Bicentennial year. The Library of Congress holds a collection of Henry A. Kissinger’s papers covering his years of government service and donated to the Library in 1977.

Application Deadline: November 1

Research Areas: Any aspect of foreign policy or international relations involving the United States. The approach may draw upon biography, history, the social sciences, and the full linguistic, photographic, legal, film and other resources of the Library of Congress. 

Eligibility: Open to distinguished scholars worldwide.

Stipend: $13,500 per month (up to ten months).

Further information:
   The John W. Kluge Center
   phone: (202) 707-3302
   fax: (202) 707-3595
   email: scholarly@loc.gov

Subscribe to our RSS Feed:
   To learn about news, events, and
   application and nomination periods.
   Subscribe now

 

Chair Holders

John Bew - Thirteenth Kissinger Chair (2013-2014)

John Bew - Thirteenth Kissinger Chair (2013-2014)

Seminar series: “The Return of Realpolitik: A Window into the Soul of Anglo-American Foreign Policy”
View event page | Read news release

Reader in History and Foreign Policy at the War Studies Department at King’s College London and Director of the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence. At the Library of Congress he researched and wrote the first-ever English-language book on the concept of realpolitik in the English-speaking world. Read announcement

William I. Hitchcock - Twelfth Kissinger Chair (2012-2013)

William I. Hitchcock - Twelfth Kissinger Chair (2012-2013)

Lecture: “The Ike Age: Eisenhower, America and the World of the 1950s” View Webcast | Read News Release

A professor of history at the University of Virginia and a senior scholar at the Miller Center for Public Policy, Hitchcock has written widely on Cold War trans-Atlantic relations and European international affairs in the post-World War II era. At the Library of Congress he researched his book, “The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World in the 1950s.” Read announcement

Alexander Evans - Eleventh Kissinger Chair (2011-2012)

Alexander Evans - Eleventh Kissinger Chair (2011-2012)

Lecture: “Pakistan’s Strategic Culture”

A counselor in the British diplomatic service, former senior adviser to the late Ambassador Richard Holbrooke and then to Ambassador Marc Grossman, and the U.S. special representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan, Evans has published widely on South Asia, international security and the nature of policy advice. At the Library of Congress he researched Pakistan’s strategic culture and its influence on U.S. foreign policy goals. Read announcement

Benjamin Fordham - Tenth Kissinger Chair (2010-2011)

Banjamin Fordham, 10th Kissinger Chair (2010-2011)

Lecture: “Protectionist Empire”  |  Read News Release

Professor and chair of Binghamton University’s Political Science Department, Fordham has published numerous articles on the role of domestic economic performance in decisions to use military force abroad, the effect of party differences on policy choices about the use of force and the allocation of the military budget in the United States, and on the influence of economic interests on congressional voting on foreign economic and security policy matters. Read announcement

C. Raja Mohan - Ninth Kissinger Chair (2009-2010)

C. Raja Mohan - Ninth Kissinger Chair (2009-2010)

Panel: “The United States and Sino-Indian Maritime Rivalry”

Professor of South Asian studies at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and leading Indian foreign-policy analyst. At the Library of Congress, Mohan researched the evolution of India’s grand foreign policy strategy and its growing security cooperation with the United States. Read announcement

Ambassador Teresita C. Schaffer - Eighth Kissinger Chair (2008)

Ambassador Teresita C. Schaffer - Eighth Kissinger Chair (2008)

Panel: “India and the United States: Reinventing Partnership” | Read News Release

Former Ambassador and expert on economic, political, security and risk management trends in India and Pakistan, as well as on the region that extends from Afghanistan through Bangladesh. At the Library, Ambassador Schaffer researched the likely evolution of the relationship between India and the United States.

W. R. Smyser - Seventh Kissinger Chair (2008)

W. R. Smyser - Seventh Kissinger Chair (2008)

Lecture: “Is Diplomacy the Answer?”

Adjunct professor in the BMW Center for German and European Studies, Georgetown University, and expert on the economy and politics of Europe and on global humanitarian matters. At the Library of Congress, Smyser conducted studies on diplomacy. Read announcement

Charles A. Kupchan - Sixth Kissinger Chair (2007)

Charles Kupchan - Sixth Kissinger Chair (2007

Lecture: “Dead Center: The Collapse of Bipartisanship and Its Implications for U.S. Foreign Policy”  |  Read News Release

Professor in the School of Foreign Service and in the Government Department at Georgetown University, at the Library of Congress, Kupchan examined the impact of political partisanship on United States engagement in global affairs. Read announcement

James M. Goldgeier - Fifth Kissinger Chair (2006)

James M. Goldgeier - Fifth Kissinger Chair (2006)

Lecture: “End of the Cold War”  |  Read News Release
Lecture: “America Between The Wars”  |  Read News Release

Professor of political science and director of the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University and an adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. At the Library, Goldgeier examined the growing division between the European Union, NATO, and the former Soviet Union. Read announcement

Melvyn P. Leffler - Fourth Kissinger Chair (2005)

Melvyn P. Leffler - Fourth Kissinger Chair (2005)

Lecture: “Retreat from Armageddon? Khrushchev, Kennedy, Johnson and the Elusive Quest for Peace”  |  Read News Release

Dean of the faculty of arts and sciences and Edward Stettinius Professor of American History at the University of Virginia and a leading authority on modern U.S. foreign relations. At the Library, Leffler analyzed efforts by policymakers in Washington and Moscow to reduce the confrontational nature of the Cold War. Read announcement

Xiang Lanxin - Third Kissinger Chair (2003-2004)

Xiang Lanxin - Third Kissinger Chair (2003-2004)

Lecture: “The Ideological Context of U.S.-China Relations” | Read News Release

Professor of international history and politics at the Institut Universitaire de Hautes Études Internationales in Geneva, Switzerland. At the Library, Xiang analyzed American assumptions about the need to democratize China. Read announcement

Klaus W. Larres - Second Kissinger Chair (2002-2003)

Klaus Larres - Second Kissinger Chair (2002-2003)

Lecture: “Downward Course: European-American Relations from the 1970s to the Present” | Read News Release

Author and editor of several books including "Churchill's Cold War: The Politics of Personal Diplomacy," "The Cold War: Essential Readings," and "Uneasy Allies: British-German Relations and European Integration since 1945."  At the Library of Congress, Larres researched the United States and the 'Unity of Europe': a comparative analysis of American policy-making and European integration in the post-1945 and post-1990 eras. Read announcement

Aaron L. Friedberg - First Kissinger Chair (2001-2002)

Klaus Larres - Second Kissinger Chair (2002-2003)

Lecture: The United States as an Asian Power: 1787-2002

Princeton professor appointed on April 27, 2001 as the first Henry Alfred Kissinger Scholar. His residence, which began in September 2001, inaugurated the Henry Alfred Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress. At the Library of Congress he researched the rise of Asia and its implications for America. Read announcement

Application Deadline: November 1

Research Areas: Any aspect of foreign policy or international relations involving the United States. The approach may draw upon biography, history, the social sciences, and the full linguistic, photographic, legal, film and other resources of the Library of Congress. 

Eligibility: Open to distinguished scholars worldwide.

Stipend: $13,500 per month (up to ten months).

Further information:
   The John W. Kluge Center
   phone: (202) 707-3302
   fax: (202) 707-3595
   email: scholarly@loc.gov

Subscribe to our RSS Feed:
   To learn about news, events, and
   application and nomination periods.
   Subscribe now

 

Kissinger Lecturers

The Kissinger Lecturer was created through the generosity of friends of the former Secretary of State to honor both the man and a field of inquiry so important for America's future.

The Kissinger Lecturer is appointed by the Librarian of Congress upon the recommendation of the Kissinger Chair Steering Committee. The Kissinger Lecturer, like the Kissinger Scholar, has achieved distinction in the field of foreign affairs and may be of any nationality.

Past Lectures

James A. Baker III 6th Kissinger Lecture (2012)
President of Mexico Felipe Calderón
Webcast 

James A. Baker III 5th Kissinger Lecture (2007)
James A. Baker III
Webcast | Press Release

Fernando Henrique Cardoso 4th Kissinger Lecture (2005)
Fernando Henrique Cardoso
Webcast | Press Release

George Shultz 3rd Kissinger Lecture (2004)
George Shultz
Webcast | Press Release

Valéry Giscard d'Estaing 2nd Kissinger Lecture (2003)
Valéry Giscard d'Estaing
Webcast | Press Release

Henry Alfred Kissinger Inaugural Lecture (2001)
Henry Alfred Kissinger
Press Release

By Nomination Only

There will be no direct applications for the Kissinger Lecturer but nominations are welcome and may be submitted at any time to:

   Kissinger Chair Steering Committee
   c/o Office of Scholarly Programs
   Library of Congress
   101 Independence Avenue S.E.
   Washington, D.C. 20540-4860

Or, nominations may be submitted by fax or email:

   202-707-3595 (fax)
   scholarly@loc.gov (email)

Telephone nominations will not be accepted.

 

Applications

Applications are accepted annually from scholars worldwide for the Kissinger Chair. Scholars may also be nominated by colleagues for this senior chair position. There will be no direct applications for the Kissinger Lecturer, but nominations are welcome any time. See the Nominations tab for details.

Eligibility

Applicants for the Kissinger Scholar may be of any nationality and will have achieved distinction in the field of foreign affairs. Scholars may apply or be nominated by colleagues. Nominations may be submitted via email to scholarly@loc.gov or faxed to (202) 707-3595.

Tenure & Stipend

The Kissinger Scholar may be in residence at The John W. Kluge Center for a period of up to 10 months, at a stipend of $13,500 per month. The Library of Congress will pay stipends monthly by means of electronic transfer to a U.S. bank account. Transportation arrangements, housing, and health care insurance and costs are the responsibility of the Scholar. The Library will provide Scholars with information on housing and can provide Scholars with contacts for commercial providers of health care insurance. The Library is required to ensure that nonresident alien visitors maintain minimum levels of medical insurance, and will provide information about insurers that offer qualifying policies to nonresident aliens.

Process

Applicants must submit:

  • A completed application form, in English
  • A curriculum vitae
  • A single paragraph abstract
  • A statement of proposed research (maximum 5 pages)
  • An explanation of why the Library of Congress is the appropriate venue for your research
  • 3 letters of reference (in English) from people who have read the research proposal

The Selection Committee will consider the application materials in relation to other proposals. Proposals may involve any aspect of foreign relations or foreign policy involving the United States.

Due Date

The annual application deadline is November 1, with the Chair commencing anytime after September 1 of the next year. Application materials must be postmarked by the deadline date to be considered. Applicants are urged to consider submitting their application materials online to scholarly@loc.gov or by fax (202-707-3595) to avoid any problems caused by mail delivery.

Expectations

The Kissinger Scholar is expected to engage in serious, sustained research leading to a publishable book on subjects involving foreign policy and international affairs. The approach may draw upon biography, history, the social sciences, and the full linguistic, photographic, legal, film and other resources of the Library of Congress. 

Contact Information

Completed application packets, questions, and other requests for information should be sent to scholarly@loc.gov or to the following address. Please note that continuing mail delivery problems at the Library may require submitting the application packet by fax or email, to insure delivery by the deadline date:

The Kissinger Chair Program
The John W. Kluge Center / Office of Scholarly Programs
Library of Congress, LJ-120
101 Independence Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20540-4860
tel. 202 707-3302; fax 202 707-3595
email: scholarly@loc.gov

Application Deadline: November 1

Research Areas: Any aspect of foreign policy or international relations involving the United States. The approach may draw upon biography, history, the social sciences, and the full linguistic, photographic, legal, film and other resources of the Library of Congress. 

Eligibility: Open to distinguished scholars worldwide.

Stipend: $13,500 per month (up to ten months).

Further information:
   The John W. Kluge Center
   phone: (202) 707-3302
   fax: (202) 707-3595
   email: scholarly@loc.gov

Subscribe to our RSS Feed:
   To learn about news, events, and
   application and nomination periods.
   Subscribe now

 

Nominations

Nominations are welcome for both the Kissinger Program appointments: the annual Kissinger Scholar and the periodic Kissinger Lecturer.

Nominations should be submitted via email to scholarly@loc.gov or by fax (202) 707-3595.

If necessary, nominations may be submitted in writing to the attention of:

Kissinger Chair Program
The John W. Kluge Center / Office of Scholarly Programs
Library of Congress
101 Independence Avenue, S.E.
Washington DC 20540-4860

Telephone nominations will not be accepted.

Kissinger Scholar

Once it is determined that a nominee for the Kissinger Scholar appointment is willing to be a candidate in the selection process, he or she will be sent an application form.

The deadline for all application materials is November 1, in any given year, so nominators should allow enough time for their nominees to prepare and submit the required materials.

The selection committee for the Kissinger Scholar considers both nominations and applications.

Kissinger Lecturer

The Kissinger Lecturer is appointed by the Librarian of Congress.

Nominations are welcome, but there will not be direct applications. Selection will be based upon an achieved level of distinction.

Learn More

Kluge Center Logo

Have questions about chairs, fellowships & partnerships at The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress?

Email us at:
   scholarly@loc.gov

Write to us at:
   The John W. Kluge Center
   Library of Congress
   101 Independence Ave SE
   Washington DC 20540-4860

Subscribe to our RSS Feed:
   To learn about news, events, and
   application and nomination periods.
   Subscribe now

 

Back to top